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  • Having left the group in 1965, Fritz Fryer formed the folk-rock trio, Fritz, Mike and Mo,[2] in collaboration with songwriter Mike Deighan and Maureen Edwards (born c. 1931).[4][5] Deighan had co-written material for the Four Pennies, including three tracks on their first album, Two Sides of Four Pennies. Fritz, Mike and Mo recorded two unsuccessful singles for Philips, "Somebody Stole the Sun" c/w "Let Me Hear Your Voice" and "What Colour Is A Man" (a cover version of a US release by Bobby Vinton, who also provided the Pennies' "Trouble Is My Middle Name") c/w "So Now You're Gone". After the failure of Fritz, Mike and Mo, Fryer returned to the Four Pennies in 1966. After the group's dissolution, Fryer worked as record producer for Motörhead among others.[2]
  • Lionel Morton recorded two solo singles for Philips in the wake of the Pennies' dissolution. He also recorded a version of "Waterloo Road," a song written by ex-Penny Mike Wilsh and Mike Deighan, for RCA Victor. "Waterloo Road" was originally recorded by the pop-psychedelic band Jason Crest, who were discovered by members of the Four Pennies. Morton, who was at one time married to the actress, Julia Foster,[2] went on to become a children's TV presenter in the 1960s and 70s.
  • Alan Buck had drummed for both Joe Brown's Bruvvers, and Johnny Kidd's Pirates, prior to joining The Four Pennies.
  • The Four Pennies appeared in two films. British Big Beat (1965) had the group miming to their no. 1 hit, "Juliet", whilst Pop Gear (also 1965) contained performances of both "Juliet" and "Black Girl".


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